Vaccinations

From WabbitWiki
Jump to: navigation, search

Vaccinations for rabbits for myxomatosis and viral haemorrhagic disease are available in several parts of the world and are advisable if available. Rabbits that catch either of the diseases are generally not expected to recover, and euthanasia is the common decision when diagnosed.

Myxomatosis vaccine

The myxomatosis vaccine can be given to rabbits over 5 weeks of age and should not be given to pregnant does.[1]:90 It must be given by subcutaneous injection into the scruff of the neck to healthy animals.[1]:88 Boosters should be given annually.

It is not advisable to administer both myxomatosis and VHD vaccine at the same time. At least 2 weeks should elapse between vaccinations.[1]:90

Nobivac Myxo-RHD is the only vaccine available that protects rabbits against myxomatosis as well as the original variant of RHD.

Viral haemorrhagic disease vaccine

The VHD vaccine is given to rabbits over 10 weeks of age and can also be given during pregnancy.[1]:90 It must be given entirely subcutaneously and dispersed by massaging the injection area thoroughly.[1]:90 Boosters should be given annually.

It is not advisable to administer both myxomatosis and VHD vaccine at the same time. At least 2 weeks should elapse between vaccinations.[1]:90

Different vaccinations may be required to cover both RHDV1 and RHDV2.

  • Filavac is effective against both the original variant of RHD and RHDV2.
  • Nobivac Myxo-RHD is the most common vaccine used in the UK that protects rabbits against the original variant of RHD as well as myxomatosis.
  • Eravac is only effective against RHDV2.

Possible side effects of the VHD vaccine include the following:

  • a limp that may last for a few days. If it persists for over 2 days, please contact your vet.[2]
  • for Eravac:[3]
    • a short-lived increase in body temperature to slightly above 40C between 2-3 days following vaccination. The slight temperature increase should resolve spontaneously without treatment within 5 days.
    • nodules or swellings less than 2cm in size at the injection site. The local reactions should resolve spontaneously within 24 hours.

Further reading

Where are vaccinations available?

Rabbits in Australia can be vaccinated against VHD but not against myxomatosis.[4]

Pet rabbits in the United Kingdom can be vaccinated against both myxomatosis and viral haemorrhagic disease.[5]

Rabbits in the United States cannot be vaccinated against either diseases.[6][7][8] While outbreaks of VHD do happen occasionally, and myxomatosis is harbored as a trivial infection in some native rabbit species, no approved vaccines are currently available in the US.

Rabbits in Canada cannot be vaccinated against either disease. There are no approved vaccines for rabbits currently available in the country.

Further reading

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 1.2 1.3 1.4 1.5 Varga, M. (2013). Textbook of rabbit medicine. (2nd ed.).
  2. Save a Fluff. (n.d.). Important injections / vaccinations for your rabbits. Retrieved 01 Apr 2019 from https://www.saveafluff.co.uk/rabbit-info/vaccinations
  3. European Medicines Agency. (2016). Eravac (rabbit haemorrhagic disease vaccine, inactivated). Retrieved 01 Apr 2019 from https://www.ema.europa.eu/en/documents/overview/eravac-epar-medicine-overview_en.pdf
  4. Melbourne Rabbit Clinic. (n.d.). Vaccinations. Retrieved 30 Mar 2016 from http://www.melbournerabbitclinic.com/wordpress/?page_id=286
  5. Save a Fluff. (n.d.). Important injections / vaccinations for your rabbits. Retrieved 30 Mar 2016 from http://www.saveafluff.co.uk/rabbit-info/vaccinations
  6. ARBA. (n.d.). Frequently Asked Questions... Retrieved 30 Mar 2016 from https://www.arba.net/faq.htm#Q26
  7. The Merck Veterinary Manual. (2015). Viral Diseases of Rabbits. Retrieved 22 Aug 2016 from http://www.merckvetmanual.com/mvm/exotic_and_laboratory_animals/rabbits/viral_diseases_of_rabbits.html.
  8. Western University of Health Sciences, The College of Veterinary Medicine. (n.d.). Western Univeristy Vet Myxo Letter. Retrieved 22 Aug 2016 from http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/vet/docs/WesternUVetMyxoLetter.pdf