Choosing a rabbit veterinarian

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It is important that you go to a rabbit-knowledgeable veterinarian for any medical issues with your rabbit. While many veterinarians may be very good at treating cats and dogs, they may not be knowledgeable in exotic care as rabbits are not usually among the species covered in veterinary medical school. Rabbit physiology and tolerance to medications is very different than cats and dogs and cannot be treated in the same manner. Incorrect treatment can easily be fatal.

If you cannot find a rabbit-savvy veterinarian within a reasonable distance, find a dog/cat veterinarian that will be willing to consult a specialist over the phone to properly diagnose and treat your rabbit. Otherwise, it may be wise to reconsider pet rabbit ownership if no acceptable nearby resources are available.

Questions to ask

The following are some questions you can ask your potential veterinarian to see if they are well-qualified to treat rabbits:

  • Do you treat rabbits?
  • Approximately how many rabbits do you see a year?
  • What percentage of the rabbits you see are indoor companions? Outdoor pets? Show/livestock animals? Veterinarians that often see rabbits as livestock will usually recommend euthanasia for any ill rabbit. If you see this type of veterinarian, you will most likely have to do a lot of educating about your rabbit’s role in your family and the lengths to which you are willing to go to keep him healthy.
  • What is the best way to prevent GI stasis? The answer is to provide unlimited hay, brush often, and give plenty of exercise.
  • What diagnostic tools and treatments do you usually use for GI slowdowns? What is your success rate? Surgery should be a last resort. X-rays should be taken if an obstruction is suspected. Motility drugs such as Reglan and Propulsid should only be prescribed if no obstructions are found. A good veterinarian will suggest supportive measures such as subcutaneous fluids, abdominal massage, and keeping the rabbit warm. Rabbits that need to syringe-fed should be given Critical Care, canned pumpkin (100% pumpkin only, not pie filling), a softened pellet mixture, Ensure or Deliver 2.0, baby foods, or some combination of these. The vet may also suggest oral fluids including Pedialyte or Gatorade. Pain medication such as Metacam and Banamine can also be appropriate.
  • What types of surgery have you performed on rabbits? What is your success rate? What type of anesthetic do you use for rabbits?
  • Should rabbits be fasted before surgery? The answer is no; rabbits should never be fasted as they cannot vomit.
  • Are you available for after-hours emergencies?

Rabbit veterinarian listings

Worldwide

United States

United Kingdom

Financial assistance

In the case that you are unable to obtain enough money due to extenuating circumstances, can provide a proof of income, and are still willing to take your pet to the veterinarian, explain your financial situation to the vets that you contact and see if you can mutually work something out. Often, vets may have some sort of charitable account or will be able to work out a payment plan for you. Otherwise, contact local shelters and rescues to see if they can help subsidize your bill or direct you to a fund that will.

See the links below for more information about organizations that can help with medical costs.

Vet-to-vet consultations

In the case that you have no local rabbit-savvy vets available, an amenable local non-rabbit-savvy vet can instead call one of the listed veterinarians below for a consultation to help diagnose your sick rabbit.

Some of these professionals charge a fee for consultations, and others do not. It will be up to your veterinarian to ask in advance.

Do not try to contact these veterinarians yourself. These veterinarians will only speak to another veterinary professional as a professional courtesy.

Further reading

Below are some experiences showing why it is important to find a rabbit-savvy vet.

  • RabbitRescue & Rehab, Thump, February 2010, Jane O’Wyatt, Robert’s Near-Spay Experience (page 8)

See also

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 House Rabbit Society, Sources of Medical Advice
  2. Referred by /u/adricat
  3. From Kathy Smith's "Rabbit Health in the 21 st Century (Second Edition)" via Lagomorphs.com