RHDV2 regulations in the US

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Main article: Rabbit hemorrhagic disease

What should I do if I suspect RHDV2 in domestic or wild rabbit(s)?

For a domestic rabbit, please contact your local rabbit-savvy veterinarian for initial assistance. For wild rabbits, contact your appropriate local state agency. The table below may be useful.

Immediately quarantine any remaining rabbits on the premises to prevent further spread.

To dispose of deceased rabbits that do not need to be submitted for necropsy and testing due to being found in an endemic area, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife writes the following:

ALWAYS use disposable glove and/or shovel if you must touch the carcass. Use 10% bleach solution (1 part bleach, 9 parts water) to spray gloves, shovel, and bottom of shoes prior to leaving area where rabbit was found to reduce risk of virus spread.

  • Burial: Carcass should be buried (3 feet minimum) when possible.
  • Incinerate: Carcass may be incinerated. Contact your local animal services agency. They may be able to dispose or incinerate carcasses. Services vary by location and there may be a charge.
  • Landfill Disposal: Carcass may be double-bagged and disposed at a landfill. Spray outer bag with 10% bleach solution. Contact the landfill to ensure they will accept submissions. Local regulations and landfill services vary by location.

What RHDV2 information is available from each US state?

A few notes:

  • Filavac/Eravac approval for states are an approximation based on the first outbreak found in the specific state. Per the United States Department of Agriculture,[1]

    The two killed EU unlicensed vaccines are being allowed for emergency use in States with confirmed cases of RHDV2 and only under the direction of the State Animal Health Officials... If your State has confirmed cases, contact your regular veterinarian, who can request permission to use the vaccine from the State Veterinarian. Special Permit applications for importation will only be considered with the approval of the State Veterinarian.

    Not all states had veterinarians that were willing to go through the lengthy import process for the European vaccines before the domestic Medgene vaccine was available for purchase.
  • Once the Medgene vaccine was given emergency approval in late Sep 2021, the USDA no longer allowed any new permits for the European vaccines. Per the California Department of Food and Agriculture,[2]

    Previously, there was no RHD vaccine approved for use in the United States (U.S.), so USDA allowed veterinarians to import European vaccine. Now that a U.S. vaccine is available, USDA has ceased issuing new permits for importation of European RHD vaccines.

    However, veterinarians with previously valid permits were allowed to continue to source the European vaccines until their permits expired (a year from issue).
  • Many states have recommendations for CVIs for rabbits arriving for shows and conventions, but they are not strictly enforced, just encouraged.

WabbitWiki make no claims as to the accuracy and completeness of the scope of these regulations at any point in time. Please check for yourself to see if the following regulations are still current or have been updated.

State Outbreak Vaccine approval Reporting instructions Import regulations Biosecurity recommendations
Alabama No Yes
  • 2021/10/05 Medgene[3]
As RHDV2 is a reportable disease, Alabama Department of Agriculture & Industries notes,[4]

Veterinarians encountering any of these conditions or other reportable diseases as listed in the Accredited Veterinarians Manual should report promptly by phone to the State Veterinarian 334-240-7253 or Federal (USDA) Assistant District Director (AL/TN) 615-781-5310 (after hours 1-866-536-7593).

N/A
Alaska No No From Department of Environmental Conservation,[5]

Alaska State Animal Health regulations (18 AAC 36.015) require all animals imported into the State to have a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) issued by a licensed and accredited veterinarian within 30 days of import.

On August 11, 2020, the Office of the State Veterinarian implemented additional import requirements for rabbits due to an outbreak in multiple states of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHDV) in the lower 48. Rabbits coming from a state with a positive detection of RHDV in domestic or wild rabbits or hares, from a quarantine zone, or from an area within 10 miles of a diagnosed case of RHDV must have an approved import permit issued by the State of Alaska. Import permits may be applied for online by the veterinarian issuing the Certificate of Veterinarian Inspection using our Animal Tracking System, or they may contact the Office of the State Veterinarian at 907-375-8215. Refer to the eCVI tutorial (DOC) for step-by-step instructions about how to use this system.

Arizona Yes Yes
  • 2020/04 Filavac/Eravac
  • 2021/11/24 Medgene[3]
From Arizona Department of Agriculture,[6]

Rabbit owners who have questions about this disease should contact their veterinarians. If a case is suspected, veterinarians should contact APHIS or email diseasereporting@azda.gov to contact the State Veterinarian’s Office or call 623-236-7201 for wildlife issues.

N/A From Arizona Department of Agriculture,[7]

Strict biosecurity practices are the backbone of prevention. Essential steps include:

  • Keep a closed rabbitry
  • Exclude wild and feral rabbits and predators from rabbitry
  • Wash hands between handling rabbits in different pens or cages
  • Clean and disinfect* equipment, tools, footwear, feed and water containers, cages, etc.
  • Control flies and biting insects
  • Remove brush, grass, weeds, trash, and debris from rabbitry
  • Protect feed from contamination by flies, birds, rodents, etc.
  • Do not feed grass or other forage that could be contaminated with the virus
  • Do not use forage, branches, etc. for bedding
  • House rabbits indoors if possible
  • Do not share equipment with others who raise rabbits
  • Remove and bury or dispose of dead rabbits promptly
  • Submit carcasses for examination and sampling promptly
  • Contact a veterinarian promptly if sick or dead rabbits are observed
  • Do not transport rabbits into or out of RHD quarantine areas
  • Quarantine new rabbits or those returning from shows for one month

*Recommended disinfectants include those in the phenol class or 10 percent bleach. Clean thoroughly with soap and water first and apply disinfectant for recommended contact time. Rinse well and let dry before allowing animal contact.

Arkansas No Yes
  • 2021/11/01 Medgene[3]
From Arkansas Department of Agriculture,[8]

Please report any sick or dead wild rabbits found in Arkansas as soon as possible to the Arkansas Game and Fish Commission at agfc.health@agfc.ar.gov. Please include an estimate of the number of animals involved, the exact location of the event, and a description of what you observed. Pictures are very helpful. Do not pick up or handle sick animals or carcasses unless specifically instructed to do so. It is not necessary to report individual animals that have been hit by vehicles or experienced other obvious trauma.

...

The primary clinical signs associated with RHDV-2 include sudden death, often involving multiple animals, and occasionally blood around the nose or mouth. Some animals may develop fever, jaundice, loss of appetite, act lethargic or show respiratory or nervous issues. If you see any of these signs, contact your veterinarian or the Arkansas Agriculture Department Livestock and Poultry Division at 501-225-1598 immediately.

From Arkansas Department of Agriculture,[9]

No rabbits or hares may be transported into the state of Arkansas if originating from a state or country where Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHD – either strain) has been diagnosed in the prior twelve (12) months unless they meet the following requirements:

  • Must have a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) from an accredited veterinarian that states:
    1. “All rabbits and hares in the shipment have been examined within forty-eight (48) hours of shipment, are found free of communicable diseases and have originated from a single premises that has no signs of a communicable disease. Rectal temperatures recorded at examination did not indicate an elevated body temperature.
    2. There has been no movement of rabbits or hares onto the originating premises within thirty (30) days prior to shipment.
    3. No rabbits or hares in the shipment have had contact with wild rabbits or hares within thirty (30) days prior to shipment.”
  • Must record an Arkansas Entry Permit number on the CVI.
From Arkansas Department of Agriculture,[9]

Rabbit owners should be mindful of the heightened risk of adding new rabbits to their facilities at this time.

Biosecurity is the best defense against RHDV-2 infection of your rabbits. Avoid contact with other rabbits, their owners, kids for playdays, vehicles, equipment and feed supplies. Change shoes before entering any of your rabbit housing; dedicate a pair of easily cleaned shoes to the rabbit shed and do not wear them outside the enclosure. Fence your animals away from access to your rabbitries, especially feed trays and water sources. SACK ALL BEDDING FOR DISPOSAL and secure storage. Burning used rabbit litter may be hazardous.

In a linked brochure,[8]

  • If you have traveled to an area where RHDV-2 is known to occur or have observed unexplained rabbit mortality while in an area, please clean and disinfect your clothing, footwear, and any gear (camping, hiking, biking equipment, etc.) before using them in another location. For instructions on disinfection and a map of known RHDV-2 affected areas, please visit www.agfc.com/riskid.

...

  • Do not allow pet, feral, or wild rabbits to have contact with your rabbits or gain entry to the facility or home.
  • Do not allow visitors in rabbitries or let them handle pet rabbits without protective clothing (including coveralls, shoe covers, hair covering, and gloves).
  • Always wash hands with warm soapy water before entering your rabbit area, after removing protective clothing and before leaving the rabbit area.
  • Do not introduce new rabbits from unknown or untrusted sources. Do not add rabbits to your rabbitry from animal shelters or other rescue operations.
  • If you bring outside rabbits onto your premises, keep them in a separate location/building from your existing rabbits. Use separate equipment for newly acquired or sick rabbits to avoid spreading disease. Always care for new rabbits after visiting other enclosures and wear separate shoes, headwear and clothing. Wash hands and arms between groups.
  • Sanitize all equipment and cages moved on or off premises before they are returned to the rabbitry. Disinfect with 10% bleach or 10% sodium hydroxide mixed with water.
  • Consult a veterinarian to review and enhance biosecurity practices.
California Yes Yes
  • 2020/05 Filavac/Eravac
  • 2021/10/05 Medgene[3]
From California Department of Food and Agriculture,[10]

Please report dead domestic rabbits to CDFA at 909-947-4462. Consult your private veterinarian if your domestic rabbit is sick. Report dead wild rabbits to the California Department of Fish & Wildlife at 916-358-2790 or https://wildlife.ca.gov/Conservation/Laboratories/Wildlife-Health/Monitoring/Mortality-Report.

From County of Los Angeles Public Health,[11]

To report a case in Los Angeles County:

  • Call 213-288-7060 and ask to speak to the veterinarian on duty (Monday-Friday, 8am-5pm), or
  • Complete the reporting form here and email to vet@ph.lacounty.gov or fax to 213-481-2375
From California Department of Food and Agriculture,[10]

No rabbits, hares, or their products (meat, pelts, hides, carcasses, etc.) and equipment or other items or associated materials may enter California from states or countries where Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHD) has been diagnosed in the prior 12 months unless they meet the following requirements.

  1. All live rabbits and hares require a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection, and must be inspected by an accredited veterinarian within 72 hours prior to shipping to California. The CVI must include a statement by an accredited veterinarian certifying that:
    • All rabbits and hares in the shipment have been examined for and found free of communicable diseases, and
    • All rabbits and hares have originated from a single premises that has no signs of a communicable disease, and
    • There have been no movements of rabbits and hares onto the premises over the prior 30-days, and
    • The animals have had no contact with wild rabbits or hares in the past 30 days.
  2. No rabbits and hares or rabbit and hare products (meat, pelts, hides, carcasses, etc.) and equipment or other items or associated materials may enter California from a premises known to be affected with RHD.
    Colorado Yes Yes
    • 2020/05 Filavac/Eravac
    • 2021/10/12 Medgene[3][12]
    From Colorado Department of Agriculture,[13]
    • Owners: Rabbit owners who have questions about the disease should contact their veterinarian.
    • Domestic: Veterinarians and owners must report suspected RHDV2 cases in domestic rabbits to the State Veterinarian’s Office at 303-869-9130. Disease investigations will be completed by a Foreign Animal Disease Diagnostician.
    • Wildlife: To report suspect cases (sick or dead wild rabbits, hares, or pika), contact your local Colorado Parks and Wildlife office.
    From Colorado Department of Agriculture,[14]

    The decision to continue, postpone, or cancel rabbit shows and events will ultimately be up to the local event organizers. Event organizers are encouraged to provide CDA’s biosecurity guidance document to exhibitors prior to an event.

    At this time, the Colorado State Veterinarian's Office (CDA) recommends that rabbit owners enact strict biosecurity measures to reduce the opportunity of their herds contracting this deadly virus. This means that venues and associations that are hosting rabbit shows must be vigilant about biosecurity when housing, commingling, and handling groups of rabbits. We recommend that show officials and show veterinarians review biosecurity practices with participants and that any sick or diseased rabbits be denied entry, quarantined, and removed from the premises. If an owner experiences rabbit mortalities prior to an event, all rabbits from that household should be restricted from entering the event until RHDV2 has been ruled out.

    ...

    Certificates of veterinary inspection (CVIs): CVIs may be required 3-5 days prior to entry at an event but may not prevent rabbits who could be incubating RHDV2 from developing clinical signs of disease while at an event.

    From Colorado Department of Agriculture,[13]
    • Rabbit owners should exercise extreme caution and biosecurity to avoid accidental exposure of domestic rabbits through contaminated feed, bedding, equipment, or clothing that may have come in contact from infected wild rabbits or birds that could transfer the virus from infected wild rabbits.
    • Domestic rabbits should not be housed outdoors in areas where rabbit hemorrhagic disease has been detected in wild rabbits.

    In another document,[15]

    Restrict Outdoor Access:

    • House rabbits indoors.
    • Prevent contact with all wildlife, especially wild rabbits.
    • Do not put rabbits down on the ground to eat grass, etc.
    • Do not collect outdoor forage and browse to feed rabbits.
    • Have indoor and outdoor footwear; don’t wear outdoor shoes indoors and vice versa.

    Cleaning and Biosecurity Recommendations:

    • Wash hands before and after handling or caring for rabbits.
    • Clean and disinfect feeders and other equipment daily if possible. Clean with soap and water, rinse well, spray with or submerge in 10% bleach for 10 minutes, rinse well, and let dry before re-use.
    • Control flies, rats, cats, dogs, birds, etc. that can move the virus around on their feet or body.
    • Do not allow visitors who also have rabbits.
    • Do not handle others’ rabbits.
    • Quarantine all new rabbits for a minimum of 30 days in a separate enclosure with separate feeding and watering equipment
    Connecticut No Yes From Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection,[17]

    If you own a domestic rabbit and it becomes ill or dies suddenly, contact your veterinarian or the Connecticut Department of Agriculture’s State Veterinarian. After handling such a rabbit, wash your clothes in hot water and detergent and disinfect all contact surfaces.

    ...

    If you see a healthy rabbit suddenly die or find several dead rabbits in the same area, contact the DEEP Wildlife Division at 860-424-3011 or deep.wildlife@ct.gov.

    From Connecticut Department of Agriculture,[18]

    RABBITS:

    Domestic: See General Requirement 1

    ...

    GENERAL REQUIREMENTS:

    1. Official Interstate Health Certificate Required.

      All cattle, buffalos, Cervidae, camelids, goats, sheep, swine, equines, ratites, and poultry including chickens, turkeys, guineas, waterfowl, and pet zoological or psittacine birds must be accompanied by a copy of an official interstate health certificate. One copy of such certificate, approved by the official having jurisdiction over the disease of domestic animals in the state from which such animals or poultry are shipped or brought, shall be forwarded to the Connecticut State Veterinarian.
    Delaware No Yes
    • 2021/11/10 Medgene[3]
    From Delaware Department of Agriculture,[19]

    If your rabbit is sick, consult with your private veterinarian to seek treatment.

    To report sick or dead domestic rabbits, contact:

    Delaware Department of Agriculture
    Office of the State Veterinarian
    302-698-4500 or 302-233-1480 (after hours)
    Email: DEanimalhealth@delaware.gov

    To report sick or dead wild rabbits, contact the Division of Fish and Wildlife by phone at:

    302-735-3600 or 302-739-9912

    N/A From Delaware Department of Agriculture,[19]

    Practicing good biosecurity can help reduce the risk of people, animals, equipment, or vehicles bringing disease and pathogens to your operation. Everyone involved in the rabbitry needs to be involved in enhanced biosecurity.

    This includes:

    • Restrict traffic to your rabbitry to essential visits. Take additional precautions with visitors who are from a state or country where RHD is known to exist.
    • Avoid visits and unecessary contact with other rabbitries.
    • Always wash your hands, shower, and change your clothes after handling rabbits at a show, fair, meeting, or other rabbitry.
    • Animals returing from a show, fair, or newly introduced to the premises should be quarantined from the existing rabbitry for 30 days and always cared for last.
    • Minimize exposure to wild rabbits and hares by keeping your rabbits in hutches or cages elevated off the ground.
    • Do not allow your rabbits to graze or roam in a yard if you suspect disease in wild rabbits in your area.
    • Control dogs, coyotes, insects, birds, rodents, and other animals, which may carry disease to your rabbitry.
    • When purchasing rabbits, check the health status of the rabbitry.
    • If you are planning to travel, be aware of the rabbit disease status of the state or country you are visiting. Take steps to avoid introducing RHD to your rabbits.
    • Purchase new equipment and supplies to reduce potential contamination. Disinfect all equipment and supplies prior to using in your rabbitry.
    District of Columbia No Yes
    • 2021/11/22 Medgene[3]
    From DC Health,[20]

    In order to bring your pet into the District, your pet will need a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection issued within 30 days of travel by a Licensed Veterinarian.

    From Maryland Department of Agriculture,[21]

    All Health Certificates for animals going to Washington, DC, should be sent to the following address:

    DC Department of Health
    Animal Disease Prevention Division
    825 North Capitol Street, Suite 8001
    Washington, DC 20002
    Phone: 202-535-2323

    See the import regulations under Maryland for more details.

    Florida Yes Yes
    • 2021/06/29 Filavac/Eravac
    • 2021/10/05 Medgene[3]
    From Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services,[22]

    Sick or dead wild rabbits should be reported to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, Wildlife Health Hotline: (866) 293-9282 or wildlifehealth@myFWC.com. Sick or dead domestic rabbits should be reported to the Division of Animal Industry at RAD@FDACS.gov or calling (850) 410-0900.

    From Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services,[22]

    All rabbits imported into Florida from a non-RHDV affected state are required to have an Official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (OCVI) dated within 30 days of entry (see Animal Movement Page, https://www.fdacs.gov/Agriculture-Industry/Livestock/AnimalMovement)

    ...

    ALL SUSCEPTIBLE ANIMALS IMPORTED FROM A RHDV AFFECTED STATE MUST HAVE AN OCVI DATED WITHIN 72 HOURS OF ENTRY AND A VETERINARY STATEMENT

    ...

    5C-3.015 Rabbits.

    (1) All Lagomorphs originating from a state that has had RHD diagnosed in wild or domestic animals in the past twenty-four (24) months, are required to be accompanied by an Official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. The OCVI must include the statement in subsection 5C3.015(2), F.A.C. and be signed and dated by the examining veterinarian within seventy-two (72) hours prior to entry into Florida.

    (2) The OCVI must include the following statement from the examining veterinarian, “All animals on this shipment have not been exposed to a known or suspected case of RHD and show no clinical signs of diseases on the inspection date of (inspection/examination date).”

    Rulemaking Authority 570.07(21), (23), 585.08(2)(a) FS. Law Implemented 585.08(1), 585.145 FS. History–New 1-31-21.

    From Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services,[22]
    • Keep a closed rabbitry.
    • Exclude wild and feral rabbits from the rabbitry.
    • Wash your hands between handling rabbits in different pens.
    • Control flies and biting insects.
    • Clean and disinfect equipment, tools, footwear, feed and water containers, and cages.
    • Recommended disinfectants include those in the phenol class or 10 percent bleach. Clean thoroughly with soap and water first and apply disinfectant for recommended contact time. Rinse well and allow to dry before allowing animal contact.
    • House rabbits indoors if possible.
    • Do not share equipment with others who raise rabbits.
    • Contact your veterinarian if sick or dead rabbits are observed and submit carcasses for examination and prompt sampling.
    • Do not transport rabbits into or out of RHDV quarantine areas.
    • Separate new rabbits or those returning from shows for one month.
    Georgia Yes Yes
    • 2021/06 Filavac/Eravac
    • 2021/10/05 Medgene[3]
    From Georgia Department of Agriculture,[23]

    Veterinarians should report sick or dead domestic rabbits to the State Veterinarian’s office at (404) 656-3667 or the office of the USDA Area Veterinarian in Charge (AVIC) at (770) 761-5420. Sick or dead wild rabbits should be reported to the Georgia Department of Natural Resources at 1-(833)-557-3303 or (706) 557-3333.

    From Georgia Department of Agriculture,[23]

    Georgia requires an official CVI issued within the previous 30 days for domestic rabbits entering the state for sale, trade, adoption or exchange for a fee or other type of compensation. GDA is currently reviewing this rule and if appropriate, will post any updates to entry requirements for rabbits coming into Georgia.

    Hawaii No No From State of Hawaii Animal Industry Division,[24]
    • Require a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI), also known as a health certificate. The CVI must be issued and signed by a State, Federal, or accredited veterinarian within 72 hours prior to arrival in Hawaii.
    • The CVI must list and give a description of the rabbit(s) in the shipment, must state that the rabbit(s) were not showing signs of infectious, contagious and/or communicable diseases and were found free of external parasites.
    • Rabbits are required to enter the State only through the Honolulu International Airport where they are required to be submitted by an agent of the airline carrier to the Airport Animal Quarantine Holding Facility for inspection. Hours of inspection are 7:45 a.m. – 4:30 p.m.
    • Once inspection is complete and all entry requirements have been met, the rabbits may be released to the importer
    Idaho Yes Yes
    • 2021/03 Filavac/Eravac
    • 2021/10/05 Medgene[3]
    From Idaho State Department of Agriculture,[25]

    Do not touch any dead rabbits you may see near an area where RHD has been identified. Anyone encountering a dead wild rabbit is asked to leave the carcass in place and contact the IDFG:

    ...

    If you suspect your rabbit may have RHD, contact your veterinarian immediately and notify the ISDA. RHD is a mandatory reportable disease in Idaho.

    From Idaho State Department of Agriculture,[26]

    All animals entering the state of Idaho require, at the very least, a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI)*. Individual species may have additional requirements as set forth in IDAPA 02.04.21 “Rules Governing the Importation of Animals.” Please use this information as a general guide when shipping small animals into Idaho, and don’t hesitate to contact us when you have questions...

    Permits are no longer required when using an approved electronic CVI form. The only approved eCVI forms are those from GlobalVetLink, State of Oregon (Oregon veterinarians only), AgMove (formerly AgView), Vet Sentry, Mi-Corporation, myVetTech, Acclaim Systems VET CVI and State of Texas. If you are not using one of these forms, normal permit requirements still apply.

    ...

    Exotic Animals

    • CVI with the full physical address of the destination.
    • Entry permit.
    Illinois No Yes
    • 2021/10/05 Medgene[3]
    From Illinois Department of Agriculture,[27]

    The disease is highly contagious and often fatal. Infected rabbits may show high fevers, lethargy, anorexia, seizures, bleeding from the nose/mouth/rectum, or difficulty breathing. However in many cases sudden death may be the only clinical sign... Immediately report animals with any of these signs to state or federal animal health officials.

    N/A[28]
    Indiana No Yes
    • 2021/10/07 Medgene[29]
    Report sick or dead rabbits to the following contacts:[30] N/A From Indiana State Board of Animal Health,[31]
    • Monitor rabbits daily for signs of illness.
    • Before caring for rabbits, wash hands and change into farm-dedicated clothing and boots.
    • Minimize visitors to rabbit housing areas.
      • Provide disposable foot covers and gloves to visitors handling rabbits.
    • Prevent contact with wild rabbits and areas where wild rabbits roam.
    • Do not purchase rabbits from unfamiliar or untrusted sources.
    • Do not collect and use wild plants as a food source.
    • Store feed and bedding in tightly sealed containers to prevent contamination.
    • Do not share equipment with other rabbit owners.
    • Clean and disinfect equipment, waterers, feeders and other items that come in contact with rabbits regularly. Rinse waterers and feeders before filling.
    • Remove manure regularly.
    • Control rodents and insects.
    • Isolate new rabbits and rabbits returning from a show for at least 30 days and monitor for signs of illness. To protect against rabbit hemorrhagic disease, isolate for 60 days.
      • Care for isolated rabbits only after caring for other rabbits. Practice proper hygiene after caring for rabbits.
    • If possible, avoid traveling to areas experiencing a disease outbreak.
    Iowa No Yes From

    If you suspect your rabbits are sick with RHDV or were exposed to it, immediately call the Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship at (515) 281-5305 or the USDA at (515) 284-4140.

    From the Iowa Legislature,[33]

    65.3(3) Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI). Animals imported into the state must be accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection, unless specifically exempted by this chapter.

    a. A Certificate of Veterinary Inspection is a legible record accomplished on an official form of the state of origin, issued by a licensed accredited veterinarian and approved by the chief livestock health official of the state of origin; or an equivalent form of the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) issued by a federally employed veterinarian. A Certificate of Veterinary Inspection may be an official paper form or an official approved electronic form.
    b. A copy of the approved CVI shall be forwarded immediately to the chief livestock health official of the state of origin for approval and transmittal.
    c. An approved CVI shall not be valid more than 30 days from the date of inspection of the animals.
    d. The approved CVI must accompany the animals to their final destination in Iowa.
    e. All information required on the CVI must be fully completed by the issuing veterinarian and must include the following:

    (1) Name and address of the consignor;
    (2) Name and address of the consignee;
    (3) Point of origin and premises identification, if assigned by the chief livestock health official in the state of origin;
    (4) Point of destination of the animals;
    (5) Date of examination;
    (6) Number of animals examined;
    (7) Official individual identification or group identification of all animals;
    (8) Sex, age, and breed of each animal;
    (9) Test results and herd or state status on diseases specified in this chapter;
    (10)Pre-entry permit number, if required; and
    (11) A statement by the issuing veterinarian that the animals identified on the CVI are free of signs of infectious or communicable disease.

    From Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship,[32]

    While a vaccine is available, practicing good biosecurity is still the best way to protect the health of domestic rabbits. The U.S. Department of Agriculture Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service and Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship recommend:

    • Preventing pet rabbits or breeding stock from coming into contact with wild rabbits.
    • Limiting visitors to rabbitries.
    • Requiring all workers and visitors to wear protective clothing, including coveralls, shoe covers, hair coverings and gloves.
    • Washing hands with warm, soapy water before entering a rabbit area, after removing protective clothing and before leaving the rabbit area.
    • Sanitizing all equipment and cages that have been taken off the premises before returning them to the rabbitry.
    • Separating new rabbits, or rabbits that have traveled to an exhibition, from the existing rabbit colony for at least 30 days.
    • Isolating rabbits that are showing clinical signs of diseases from the rest of the colony.
    • Caring for new rabbits, rabbits that have traveled to an exhibition, and ill rabbits after caring for healthy rabbits to prevent the potential spread of diseases. Use separate equipment to care for these animals.
    Kansas No Yes
    • 2021/10/19 Medgene[3]
    From Kansas Department of Agriculture,[34]
    • Owners: Rabbit owners who have questions about the disease should contact their veterinarian.
    • Veterinarians: Veterinarians must report suspected RHDV cases in domestic rabbits to the Division of Animal Health. Disease investigations will be completed by a Foreign Animal Disease Diagnostician.
    • Wildlife: To report suspect cases (sick or dead wild rabbits, hares or pika), contact the Kansas Department of Wildlife, Parks and Tourism at 620-342-0658, Ext. 209.
    From Kansas Department of Agriculture,[35]

    General Information

    • All animals entering Kansas shall be accompanied by an official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI, health certificate) issued within 30 days prior to movement into Kansas unless moving to an approved slaughter facility or to an approved livestock market.
    • All health certificates must have physical addresses (NOT post office boxes) for both the consignor and consignee.

    ...

    Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI)

    All rabbits imported into Kansas from another state must be accompanied by a completed Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI, health certificate) signed by an accredited veterinarian. The CVI must have been issued within 30 days prior to the animal’s movement into Kansas.

    Kentucky Yes Yes
    • 2021/10/19 Medgene[3]
    From Kentucky Department of Fish & Wildlife Resources,[36]

    Due to the risk for this disease to spill over into wild rabbits, the department has increased its monitoring efforts in the area of the detection and asking for the public to report sick or deceased wild rabbits to Kentucky Fish and Wildlife at 1-800-858-1549 or Info.Center@ky.gov.

    ...

    Rabbit owners are encouraged to contact their veterinarian if pet rabbits become ill.

    Louisiana No Yes
    • 2021/10/08 Medgene[3]
    N/A
    Maine No No From Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry,[37]

    If any rabbits develop outward signs of illness, isolate them immediately and contact your veterinarian for advice and treatment. Your veterinarian will contact ME DACF if RHDV2 is suspected.

    ...

    To report suspect cases of RHDV2 in wild rabbits or unusual numbers of wild rabbit mortalities, please contact the Maine Department of Inland Fisheries and Wildlife (207-287-8000).

    From Maine Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry,[38]

    K. IMPORTATION OF DOMESTIC ANIMALS AND POULTRY FOR EXHIBITION

    1. A permit is required before animals may enter the state for exhibition.

    2. A certificate of veterinary inspection must accompany the shipment and must state that the animals described on the certificate are “For Exhibition Only”. The certificate of veterinary inspection shall be valid for a period of time beginning with the first agricultural fair and ending at the completion of the last agricultural fair scheduled for that year in the state of Maine.

    3. Exhibition animals shall only reside at the place of exhibition and may not be moved to any private place or farm in the state of Maine.

    4. Exhibition animals must meet all importation testing requirements for that species prior to obtaining a certificate of veterinary inspection.

    5. No exhibition animals may be sold or removed without meeting current importation requirements for that species.

    Maryland No Yes
    • 2021/10/05 Medgene[3]
    From Maryland Department of Agriculture,[21]

    RABBITS

    1. See General Requirements

    ...

    GENERAL REQUIREMENTS for ALL SPECIES

    Livestock and poultry imported into the State of Maryland shall meet Maryland interstate regulations and be accompanied by an approved Certificate of Veterinary Inspection or permit.

    1. Permits (Written Permission)
      1. Swine may be moved into Maryland only if granted written permission (permit).
      2. Where obtained: Application for such permits must be made in writing by the person wishing to import the animal(s) to the Animal Health Program, Maryland Department of Agriculture, 50 Harry S. Truman Parkway, Annapolis, MD. 21401, Telephone: 410-841-5810, at least 10 days before the anticipated movement.
      3. Conditions: Special permits are granted only at the discretion of the Chief, Animal Health Program and animals so imported are subject to quarantine and such testing as Chief may prescribe at the owner's risk and expense. Permits are void after 30 days.
    2. Certificates of Veterinary Inspection (CVI)
      Definition: An official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection is a legible certificate made on an official form issued and approved by the chief Animal Health official of the state of origin or the U.S. Department of Agriculture.
      1. Veterinarians must use a separate CVI for each species.
      2. Please complete ALL of the following:
        1. name and address of consignor and consignee.
        2. origin of livestock.
        3. accurate description or identification of livestock – one species only per CVI.
        4. appropriate dates and descriptions, by name, of current disease tests specifically required.
        5. status of herd of origin when required.
        6. dated statement by the approved veterinarian certifying that upon physical examination the livestock are free from any evidence of an infectious, parasitic or transmissible disease and have not recently been exposed to the same.
      3. Who May Prepare: Certificates of Veterinary Inspection shall be prepared by veterinarians in the employ of the state of origin, by those in the Veterinary Services, U. S. Department of Agriculture, or by Accredited Veterinarians. The Accredited Veterinarians must be approved by the recognized State Animal Health Official of the state of origin.
      4. How Used:
        1. A hard copy or electronic version of the approved Certificate of Veterinary Inspection must be sent to the Maryland Department of Agriculture, Animal Health Program from the official animal health department state of origin. NO FAXED COPIES will be accepted.
        2. Another copy of the approved Certificate of Veterinary Inspection stays with the issuing veterinarian and one copy shall be given to the owner to accompany the animal.
        3. Certificates shall be void after 30 days.
    Massachusetts No No From Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources,[39]

    Suspected cases of RHDV2 must be reported to the Massachusetts Department of Agriculture at (617) 626-1795 and US Department of Agriculture Veterinary Services at (508) 363-2290.

    From Massachusetts Department of Agricultural Resources,[40]

    All imported rabbits must have an official health certificate stating that the animals are healthy, free of symptoms of infectious or transmissible disease, internal and/or external parasites, and exposure to any infectious or contagious disease. Health certificates are valid for 30 days.

    Michigan No Yes
    • 2021/10/20 Medgene[3]
    From Michigan.gov,[41]

    If you find sick or dead rabbits, please contact your local DNR Field Office or the DNR Wildlife Disease Lab at 517-336-5030.

    From Michigan Agriculture & Rural Development,[42]

    Coming into Michigan from Another State (import)

    • Nonnative domestic rabbits, rodents, reptiles and amphibians must have an official interstate certificate of veterinary inspection (CVI) filled out by a United States Department of Agriculture accredited veterinarian in the animal's state of origin.
      • Please note that Michigan does not issue entry permits for nonnative domestic rabbits, rodents, reptiles, or amphibians to be imported. Therefore, no permit number is required to be written on the interstate certificate of veterinary inspection.
    • Reptiles and amphibians being imported to a registered Michigan aquaculture facility must meet state aquaculture importation requirements.
    • Check local ordinances for any further regulations that may apply.

    Exhibition (Show, fair demonstration or display) Requirements

    • There are no specific requirements for nonnative domestic rabbits, rodents, reptiles and amphibians moving within the state for exhibition.
    • Nonnative Domestic Rabbits, Rodents, Reptiles and Amphibians being imported from out of state for Exhibition:
      • Nonnative domestic rabbits, rodents, reptiles and amphibians must have an official interstate certificate of veterinary inspection (CVI) filled out by a United States Department of Agriculture accredited veterinarian in the animal's state of origin.
      • Check local ordinances for any further regulations that may apply.
    • Contact the exhibition authorities for any additional requirements.
    Minnesota Yes Yes
    • 2021/10/01 Medgene[43]
    From Minnesota Board of Animal Health,[44]

    If you find sick or dead wild rabbits, please contact your local state wildlife office to report your finding to a biologist, game warden, or wildlife veterinarian. Dead domestic rabbits should be reported to the Board of Animal Health.

    From Minnesota Board of Animal Health,[45]

    Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI)

    All birds and mammals imported into Minnesota, unless specifically exempted below, must be accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) issued by a veterinarian accredited in the state of origin. A copy of the CVI shall be forwarded within seven calendar days to the animal health officials in the state of origin for approval and transmittal.

    The CVI shall:

    • State that the animals described are not showing clinical signs of infectious, contagious, or communicable disease and that they meet movement requirements
    • State the number of animals in the shipment
    • State the species, breed, age, and sex of each animal
    • Document official identification for each animal if required
    • Document the address and contact information for the premises of origin and the premises of destination
    • State the results of any tests that are required by the board
    • State the purpose for moving the animals
      • Breeding
      • Feeding
      • Direct to slaughter
      • Other (i.e. exhibition/show)
    • Document a permit number if required
    • Document any additional information required by the board
    • Any addendums or attachments to a CVI shall comply with the CVI Addendum Policy.
    See the PDF from Minnesota Board of Animal Health here.
    Mississippi Yes Yes
    • 2021/09/29 Medgene[46]
    From Mississippi Department of Wildlife, Fisheries, and Parks,[47]

    Contact the MDWFP at (601) 432-2199 (Monday - Friday, 8 am - 5 pm) or email Rick.Hamrick@wfp.ms.gov if you find more than a few dead rabbits with no apparent explanation for cause of death. Particularly since this is a relatively new disease, state wildlife agencies are monitoring for presence of RHDV2.

    From Mississippi Board of Animal Health,[48]

    Rabbits

    See General Requirements

    ...

    General

    1. Certificates of Veterinary Inspection (CVI) Requirements – Valid Certificates of Veterinary Inspection are required on all animals except livestock or poultry consigned to Federal approved slaughter establishments. Only licensed graduate Accredited Veterinarians, or Veterinarians regularly employed by the state of origin, or Veterinary Services division of APHIS, USDA are authorized to inspect and issue official health certificates on livestock entering Mississippi. Source: Miss. Code Ann . §69-15-3.
    See the PDF from Mississippi Board of Animal Health here.
    Missouri No Yes
    • 2021/10/08 Medgene[3]
    From Missouri Department of Conservation,[49]

    If you find more than one dead rabbit, contact Wildlife Health at wildlifehealth@mdc.mo.gov and put “RHDV2” in the subject line.

    From Missouri Department of Agriculture,[50]

    2 CSR 30-2.016 Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Import Restrictions on Rabbits and Hares Entering Missouri

    PURPOSE: This rule is necessary to restrict the movement of rabbits and hares into Missouri due to the recent diagnosis of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease in the United States.

    (1) No rabbits or hares may enter Missouri if the animals have originated from a state or country where Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHD) has been diagnosed in the prior twelve (12) months unless they meet the following requirements:

    (A) Must obtain an entry permit; and

    (B) Must have a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection from an accredited veterinarian that states—

    1. All rabbits and hares in the shipment have been examined within seventy-two (72) hours of shipment for and found free of communicable diseases and have originated from a single premises that has no signs of a communicable disease;

    2. There has been no movement of rabbits and hares onto the originating premises within thirty (30) days prior to shipment; and

    3. No rabbits or hares in the shipment have had contact with wild rabbits or hares within thirty (30) days prior to shipment.

    AUTHORITY: section 267.645, RSMo 2016.* Emergency rule filed July 1, 2020, effective July 16, 2020, expired Jan. 11, 2021. Original rule filed July 1, 2020, effective Jan. 30, 2021.

    *Original authority: 267.645, RSMo 1959, amended 1993.

    Montana Yes Yes
    • 2021/02 Filavac/Eravac
    • 2021/10/08 Medgene[3]
    From Montana Department of Livestock,[51]

    RHD is reportable in Montana, meaning anyone who suspects animals may be infected is obligated to report that information. Reports should be made for both domestic and wild rabbits. If you have questions or wish to report suspected cases of RHD in domestic rabbits, please contact DOL at (406) 444-2976. To report a wild rabbit mortality, please contact FWP at (406) 577-7880.

    Montana Department of Livestock requires imported rabbits to have a health certificate issued within 30 days of entry and an import permit.[52] Permits can be obtained from the following:
    • Permit Line: 406-444-2976
    • Email: livpermits@mt.gov (Monday-Friday 8am-4:30pm)
    Nebraska No Yes From Nebraska Department of Agriculture,[53]

    RHDV is a notifiable Foreign Animal Disease, and practitioners who suspect RHDV should contact the Nebraska Department of Agriculture at 402-471-2351. Individuals who have concerns about unusual deaths of wild rabbit and hare populations are encouraged to contact Nebraska Game and Parks at 308-763-2940.

    From Nebraska Department of Agriculture,[53]

    All rabbits entering Nebraska must be accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI, or health certificate). If you are considering moving an animal into Nebraska from an affected state, please call 402-471-2351 to learn more.

    Nevada Yes Yes
    • 2020/04 Filavac/Eravac
    • 2021/10/08 Medgene[3]
    From Nevada Department of Agriculture,[54]
    • Rabbit owners should direct any questions or concerns to their veterinarian.
    • Concerns regarding wild rabbits can be directed to NDOW Wildlife Health Specialist Nate LaHue, DVM, MPVM.
    • Veterinarians with questions or suspect cases can contact the State Veterinarian directly.
    From Nevada Department of Agriculture,[55]

    1. All rabbits and hares require a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection. All rabbits and hares originating from states or countries where RHD has been diagnosed in the prior 12 months must have a CVI, and be inspected by an accredited veterinarian within the 72 hours prior to entering Nevada. The Certificate of Veterinary Inspection must include a statement by an accredited veterinarian certifying that:

    • All rabbits and hares in the shipment have been examined for, and found free of communicable diseases; and
    • All rabbits and hares have originated from a single premises that has no signs of a communicable disease; and
    • There have been no movements of rabbits and/or hares onto the premises over the prior 30 days; and
    • The animals have had no contact with wild rabbits or hares in the past 30 days.

    2. No rabbits and hares or rabbit and hare products (meat, pelts, hides, carcasses, etc) and equipment or other items or associated materials may enter Nevada from a premises known to be affected with RHD.

    New Hampshire No No N/A
    New Jersey Yes Yes From New Jersey Department of Agriculture,[56]

    Any veterinarian or other person who suspects existence of the disease should notify the NJDA, Division of Animal Health at 609-671-6400. The New Jersey Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory (NJAHDL) is available to assist with RHDV diagnosis and can be reached at 609-406-6999 or via email at jerseyvetlab@ag.nj.gov.

    N/A
    New Mexico Yes Yes
    • 2020/03 Filavac/Eravac
    • 2021/10/05 Medgene[3]
    From New Mexico Department of Game and Fish and New Mexico Livestock Board,[57]

    Guidelines for Wild Jackrabbits and Cottontails:

    • Report large numbers of dead wild rabbits to your local Conservation Officer or the Department Information Center at (888) 248-6866.

    ...

    Guidelines for Domestic Rabbits:

    ...

    • Consult your veterinarian if you experience sudden death among your rabbits.
    N/A
    New York Yes Yes
    • 2021/10/12 Medgene[3]
    From the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets,[58]

    Sick or dead domestic rabbits should be reported to the State Veterinarian’s office at 518-457-3502 or to the USDA at 866-536-7593. Multiple wild rabbits found dead or wild rabbits with blood-stained noses should be reported to the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s Wildlife Health Unit at 518-478-2203. Wild rabbits found dead on the road do not need to be reported.

    From The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets,[59]

    New York does not currently have importation requirements for rabbits. In light of incidences of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease in the western United States, we ask that all rabbit owners be aware of this disease and follow the USDA's precautions.

    From the New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets,[58]

    The following best practices are recommended:

    • Do not allow pet or wild rabbits to have contact with your rabbits or gain entry to the facility or home.
    • Do not allow visitors in rabbitries or let them handle pet rabbits without protective clothing (including coveralls, shoe covers, hair covering, and gloves).
    • Always wash hands with warm soapy water before entering your rabbit area, after removing protective clothing and before leaving the rabbit area.
    • Do not introduce new rabbits from unknown or untrusted sources. Do not add rabbits to your rabbitry from animal shelters or other types of rescue operations.
    • If you bring outside rabbits into your facility or home, keep them separated from your existing rabbits for at least 30 days. Use separate equipment for newly acquired or sick rabbits to avoid spreading disease.
    • Sanitize all equipment and cages moved on or off premises before they are returned to the rabbitry.
    North Carolina No Yes
    • 2021/12/21 Medgene[60]
    From North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission,[61]

    The N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission monitors mortality events in wild rabbits where cause of death is not readily apparent. If investigation warrants, carcasses may be submitted for diagnostic testing.

    ...

    If you see single or multiple wild rabbits with no obvious cause of death, or with blood around their nose, mouth, or rectum, please notify the N.C. Wildlife Commission via the Wildlife Helpline at 866-318-2401 or wildlifehelpline@ncwildlife.org.

    From North Carolina Office of Administrative Hearings,[62]

    02 NCAC 52B .0214 IMPORTATION REQUIREMENTS: RABBITS

    (a) An import permit from the State Veterinarian is required for the importation of a rabbit into the State of North Carolina originating from:

    (1) any country or state with Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus-2 ("RHDV-2") detected; or

    (2) a state or country without RHDV-2 if the rabbit makes any intervening stop in a country or state with RHDV-2 detected, if the rabbit is commingled or exposed to any other rabbit not being shipped directly from the point of origin together, or if the imported rabbit is exposed to materials such as cages, beddings, and supplies that have been in contact with another rabbit not shipped directly from the point of origin together.

    (b) The rabbit import permit application shall be accompanied by an official health certificate certifying the rabbit to be free from any contagious animal disease, including RHDV-2, as follows:

    (1) If the rabbit is shipped directly without any intervening stops, without commingling or exposure to any other rabbit not being shipped directly from the point of origin together, and without exposure to materials such as cages, beddings, and supplies that have been in contact with another rabbit not shipped directly from the point of origin together, then the official health certificate shall be obtained within seven days of the date of importation into North Carolina.

    (2) If the rabbit is shipped with intervening stops, with commingling or exposure to another rabbit not being shipped directly from the point of origin together, or with exposure to materials such as cages, beddings, and supplies that have been in contact with another rabbit not shipped directly from the point of origin together, then the official health certificate shall be obtained from the location of the last intervening stop, commingling, or exposure, and within seven days of the date of importation into North Carolina.

    (c) No permit is needed for direct shipment of a rabbit from a country or state without RHDV-2 or if the rabbit makes intervening stops only in countries or states without RHDV-2, the rabbit is not commingled or exposed to another rabbit not shipped directly from the point of origin together, and the rabbit is not exposed to materials such as cages, beddings, and supplies that have been in contact with another rabbit not shipped directly from the point of origin together.

    (d) The application for rabbit importation shall include the state of origin, health certificate inspection date, the owner's name, address, and phone number at the time of import, the import destination within the State of North Carolina, the name, address, and phone number of the person with control and responsibility over the rabbit at the import destination, and any federal licensing, permit, and documentation required for the importation of the rabbit if imported from outside of the United States of America.

    (e) A rabbit requiring an import permit that is imported into North Carolina shall be accompanied by an official health certificate with the import permit number and shall be made available for inspection by the State Veterinarian or his or her designee upon request.

    (f) An intervening stop is defined as a stop in a country or state longer than 24 hours but less than 10 days. The location of any stop for longer than 10 days shall be deemed the new country or state of origin.

    (g) Health certificates issued outside of the United States shall be issued in English and by a veterinarian with a valid license to practice veterinary medicine in the country of export. </bl

    See the PDF from the North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission here.
    North Dakota No Yes
    • 2021/10/05 Medgene[3]
    From North Dakota Game and Fish Department, [63]

    Anyone finding three or more dead, adult wild rabbits is asked to contact Game and Fish at 701-328-6300, or email ndgf@nd.gov. Because rabbits can die of other diseases of concern to humans, carcasses should not be handled until guidance is provided.

    From North Dakota Game and Fish Department, [63]

    Rabbit owners are reminded that a health certificate is required for all rabbits imported into the state.

    Ohio No Yes
    • 2021/10/12 Medgene[3]
    From Ohio Department of Agriculture,[64]

    If you suspect cases of the disease, have questions or need more information, please contact ODA Division of Animal Health at (614) 728-6220.

    N/A
    Oklahoma No Yes
    • 2021/10/10 Medgene[65]
    From Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry,[66]

    As of this date, the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food, and Forestry has no restrictions on rabbit shows, sales, or movements within the state.

    ...

    We would also like to remind rabbit producers that Certificates of Veterinary Inspection are required for rabbits that come into Oklahoma from another state, and that it is the responsibility of the manager of a show or sale to verify that out of state rabbits were transported with a CVI.

    From Oklahoma Department of Agriculture, Food and Forestry,[66]

    We encourage rabbit owners to practice good biosecurity to help prevent the introduction of the disease into their rabbitries. Isolate new rabbits away from the general population for two weeks prior to adding them to the general population. When taking rabbits to shows isolate them from the general population for two weeks to make sure they did not contract a disease while exposed to the other show rabbits.

    Oregon Yes Yes
    • 2021/03 Filavac/Eravac
    • 2021/10/12 Medgene[3]
    From Oregon Department of Agriculture,[67]

    If you notice any of the above symptoms in your rabbits notify the Oregon State Veterinarian immediately. To report suspected cases of RHD in rabbits please contact the Oregon State Veterinarian at 800-347-7028 or submit your information using the​ form below.

    From Oregon Department of Agriculture,[68]

    Certificate of Veterinary Inspection

    All animals transported or moved into Oregon are required to obtain a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI). The CVI document must be in the possession of the driver of the vehicle or person in charge of the animals.

    https://secure.sos.state.or.us/oard/viewSingleRule.action?ruleVrsnRsn=153907

    Import Permit

    All animals transported or moved into Oregon are required to obtain an Import Permit from the Department of Agriculture (through their veterinarian) prior to entry. The permit number must be recorded on the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection document. Import permits are valid for 15 days from the date of issuance and will not be issued based on pending test results.

    **Animals transported into Oregon and accompanied by an electronic Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (eCVI) issued by an eCVI system approved by the National Assembly of State Animal Health Officials are exempt from this requirement. Currently approved eCVI systems are:

    • AgView
    • Global Vet Link
    • ISDA eCVI
    • Mi-Corporation
    • myVetTech
    • OVIS
    • Vet Sentry

    https://secure.sos.state.or.us/oard/viewSingleRule.action?ruleVrsnRsn=153907

    Pennsylvania No Yes
    • 2021/10/21 Medgene[3]
    From Pennsylvania Pressroom,[69]

    Anyone who finds two or more dead rabbits or hares in one location with an unknown cause of death is advised not to touch or disturb those animals. Instead, they should contact their local Pennsylvania Game Commission office. Due to RHD’s foreign animal disease status, reports of potential RHD cases will be investigated by the Game Commission, PDA, and federal authorities.

    From Pennsylvania Game Commission,[70]

    Veterinary diagnostic laboratories are aware of RHD and any detections of RHDV2 in domestic lagomorphs in PA will be reported to the Game Commission.

    From the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture,[71]

    3. No rabbits or their products, such as, meat, pelts, hides, carcasses or other items, and no equipment, exposed feed or conveyances or other items or associated materials may enter the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania from a Commonwealth, State, Territory, or Country where RHD has been diagnosed in the prior twelve (12) months or there is a reasonable suspicion it exists unless they meet the following requirements:

     (a) All live rabbits must be accompanied by an ICVI and must be examined by an accredited veterinarian within the seventy-two (72) hours prior to the date of shipment to the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. The ICVI must include statements by an accredited veterinarian certifying that:

     (i) All rabbits in the shipment have been examined for and found free of infectious, contagious or communicable diseases;

     (ii) All rabbits have originated from a single premises that has no signs of infectious, contagious or communicable disease in rabbits;

     (iii) There have been no movements of rabbits onto the premises of origin within the 90 days prior to the date of shipment; and

     (iv) The rabbits have had no contact with wild or captive rabbits other than their cohorts in the 90 days prior to the date of shipment.

     (b) No rabbits or their products, such as, meat, pelts, hides, carcasses or other items, and no equipment, exposed feed or conveyances or other items or associated materials may enter the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania from a premises exposed to, contaminated with or known to be affected with RHD, or where there is a reasonable suspicion the disease exists or the rabbits have been exposed to or infected with RHD.

    From the Pennsylvania Game Commission,[72]

    1. The importation of any wild lagomorphs and their products (meat, pelts, hides, carcasses, etc.) into the Commonwealth from any Commonwealth, State, Territory, or Country where RHDV2 has been detected in wild or domestic lagomorph populations in the 12 months prior to the importation or where RHDV2 has been declared endemic in domestic or wild lagomorph populations is hereby prohibited.

    From Pennsylvania Game Commission,[70]
    • ... The public should avoid touching any dead hares or rabbits.

    ...

    • Clean and disinfect (after thoroughly cleaning, disinfect with a 1:10 solution of household bleach to water, soaking for at least 10 minutes) all surfaces and equipment that may have contacted suspected RHD-positive hares or rabbits. These precautions are incredibly important as the disease can be easily transmitted amongst and between wild and domestic populations.
    • If instructed to dispose of carcasses, either incinerate or bury them deep enough to prevent scavenging (> 3 ft). Carcasses can also be disposed of in the commercial trash. When handling any carcass, always wear gloves and double bag the carcass.
    Rhode Island No Yes
    • 2021/10/05 Medgene[3]
    From Rhode Island Department of Environmental Management,[73]

    Residents who have observed unusual rabbit mortalities consistent with the symptoms listed above or suspect that RHDV2 is affecting local rabbits should report this information to RI State Veterinarian Scott Marshall, DVM in DEM's Division of Agriculture/Animal Health at 401-222-2781 or via email to scott.marshall@dem.ri.gov; Dylan Ferreira, Senior Wildlife Biologist in DEM's Division of Fish and Wildlife at 401-789-0281or by email to dylan.ferreira@dem.ri.gov; or Sarah Riley, Implementation Aide in the Division of Fish and Wildlife at 401-789-0281 or by email to sarah.riley@dem.ri.gov.

    From Rhode Island Department of State,[74]

    1.6 General Requirements and General Exemptions

    A.No person shall import, or cause to be imported into the state, any domestic animal, including but not limited to goats, cattle, swine, sheep, equines, camelids, dogs, cats, poultry, or ratites unless such animal(s) is accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection and Import Permit pursuant to R.I. Gen. Laws Chapter 4-5, or an Owner Shipper Statement as these regulations require.

    B.No person shall import, or cause to be imported into the state, any animal(s) or bird(s) which originates from any state or region that is under any state or federal quarantine that has been issued due to the presence or suspected presence of a contagious disease unless approved, in writing, by the Rhode Island State Veterinarian.

    C.No person shall import, or cause to be imported into the state, any animal(s) or bird(s) that is affected with or has been exposed to any contagious disease unless approved, in writing, by the Rhode Island State Veterinarian.

    D.Any person required to keep records pursuant to these regulations and who receives a records request from any agent duly authorized in this document to request records, must produce those records within twenty-four (24) hours of the request being made. Such request may be made by phone, facsimile, email, text message, or other generally used means of communications.

    E.Official identification of each animal as required by state and federal animal identification laws and regulations to include, but not be limited to, any required permanent and unique identification such as official ear tags, brands, bands, registration tattoos when accompanied by breed registration papers, microchips, or other forms of identification as accepted by the Department.

    F.Exemptions from permits and specific requirements for individual species may be provided for the purpose of fair, show, and exhibition as deemed appropriate by the Rhode Island State Veterinarian. The exemptions for fair, show, and exhibition can be found in § 1.22 of this Part.

    ...

    H.Exemptions from certain pre-importation testing requirements may be made on a case-by-case basis. Anyone seeking relief from pre-importation testing requirements must receive prior written approval from the Rhode Island State Veterinarian. The Rhode Island State Veterinarian reserves the right to require in lieu of pre-importation testing requirements any post importation testing, quarantine, and/or examinations that he/she feels is as protective as the pre-importation testing. The cost of such testing, quarantine, and examination is the financial responsibility of the entity that owns/receives the animals that were imported. Any damages that result from the failure to properly test or quarantine said animals are the financial liability of the entity that owns/receives the animals.

    1.7 Certificates of Veterinary Inspection and Owner Shipper Statements

    A.No person shall import, or cause to be imported, any domestic animal unless such animal is accompanied by an official Certificate of Veterinary Inspection issued no earlier than thirty (30) days prior to the importation of said animal. The Certificate of Veterinary inspection must be physically or digitally signed by a veterinarian who is licensed and federally accredited in the state of origin. The animals for which the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection is issued must bear a form of identification that is compliant with all applicable state and federal laws and regulations. A copy of the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection must be reviewed by the state animal health official in the state of origin.

    B.The Certificate of Veterinary Inspection shall:

    1.Be on official paper forms of the state of origin, or on an electronic format that is has been approved for use by the Rhode Island State Veterinarian. Paper forms must be multipart with one part being retained by the attending veterinarian who prepared the document, one (1) part being provided to the owner/guardian of the animal(s) being shipped, one (1) copy being sent to the State Animal Health Official of the state of origin, and one (1) copy being sent to the State Animal Health Official of the state of destination after review by the State Animal Health Official of the state of origin. Electronic formats of certificates must be electronically routed or available to the same recipients as paper certificates are. Note: Forms such as the USDA form VS-7001 or similar forms that do not bear a unique serial number are not considered to meet the requirements of this Part.

    2.State that all animals listed on the form have been inspected and found free of signs of contagious, infectious, or communicable disease.

    3.Contain the date of the veterinary inspection as well as the dates of all required tests and the results of those tests.

    4.Describe the animal(s) by species, breed, age, and sex, and record all official identification, i.e., ear tag, registration tattoo, leg band, microchip, physical description (for dogs, cats, and equines only) or any other form of identification that may be approved by the Department.

    5.Contain the data for all required tests and vaccinations, including the date, result(s) of test(s), and the name and address of the laboratory that performed the test(s). All tests reported for import purposes must be USDA officially recognized tests approved by the Department and the tests must be conducted at a state or federally approved laboratory.

    6.Have complete name and address, both mailing and physical address, of the consignor and consignee. Postal Boxes or P.O. Boxes without a physical address are not acceptable.

    7.Contain the signature, whether physically or digitally signed, of the inspecting federally-accredited veterinarian.

    8.Contain an import permit number for all shipments of animals that require an import permit.

    9.All copies of the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection, whether paper or electronic format, must be sent to the State Animal Health Official of the state of origin within ten (10) days of issuance. The veterinarian who prepared the document is responsible for ensuring that the Certificate of Veterinary Inspection is sent to the State Animal Health Official of the state of origin.

    10.Certificates of Veterinary Inspection are valid for a maximum period of thirty (30) days from issuance unless otherwise noted.

    ...

    South Carolina No Yes
    • 2021/10/20 Medgene[3]
    From Clemson University,[75]

    If your rabbit becomes ill or dies and you suspect RHDV2, please contact your veterinarian.

    If you are a veterinarian and would like to submit a sample for testing or are interested in a necropsy, please contact the Clemson Veterinary Diagnostic Center at 803-726-7831 or visit their webpage.

    If you are concerned about a wild rabbit, please contact SC Department of Natural Resources:

    Michael Hook
    803-734-3940
    hookm@dnr.sc.gov

    From Clemson University,[76]

    Wildlife and Exotics Import Requirements

    CVI - Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (valid for 30 days)

    Call SC Department of Natural Resources (DNR) for additional requirements (ie. Permits) at 803-734-3886

    South Dakota Yes Yes
    • 2021/10/05 Medgene[3]
    From South Dakota Animal Industry Board,[77]

    RHDV2 is a reportable disease in South Dakota and the United States. Anyone suspecting the disease in domestic rabbits should notify the South Dakota State Veterinarian’s office at 605-773-3321.

    Individuals who observe large numbers of dead wild rabbits are encouraged to report these to the South Dakota Game, Fish & Parks 605-223-7660.

    From South Dakota Animal Industry Board,[78]

    All rabbits entering South Dakota must be accompanied by a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection (CVI, or health certificate).

    Tennessee Yes Yes
    • 2021/10/15 Medgene[79]
    From the Tennessee Department of Agriculture,[80]

    If you find dead wild rabbits, do not handle them. Contact your Tennessee Wildlife Resources Agency regional office. Suspected cases of rabbit hemorrhagic disease should be reported immediately to the Tennessee State Veterinarian’s office at 615-837-5120.

    From the Tennessee Department of Agriculture,[80]

    Rabbits, hares, and pikas entering Tennessee from another state must have a health certificate from the state of origin to enter. The certificate is valid for 30 days. Animals from states with a confirmed case of RHDV2 in the past eight months are required to have a health certificate within 72 hours of entry.

    Texas Yes Yes
    • 2020/05 Filavac/Eravac
    • 2021/10/12 Medgene[3]
    From Texas Animal Health Commission,[81]

    Rabbit owners who observe high fever, poor appetite, depression, inactivity, bloody discharges, and/or sudden death in most or all of their rabbits should call their private veterinarian right away. Only laboratory tests can confirm RHDV2 for sure. Private veterinarians are requested to contact the USDA-APHIS or the TAHC to report any suspected cases at 1-800-550-8242. Report all unusual mass morbidity (sickness) or mortality (deaths) events to the TAHC.

    Utah Yes Yes
    • 2020/06 Filavac/Eravac
    • 2021/10/05 Medgene[3]
    From Utah Department of Agriculture and Food,[82]

    For wild rabbits, contact the Division of Wildlife Resources.

    For domestic rabbits, contact your veterinarian or the Utah State Veterinarian at (801) 982-2235.

    From Utah Department of Agriculture and Food,[82]

    No rabbits, hares or their products (meat, pelts, hides, carcasses, etc) and equipment or other items or associated materials may enter Utah from states or countries where Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHD) has been diagnosed in the prior 12 months unless they meet the following requirements:

    1. All live rabbits and hares require a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection, and must be inspected by an accredited veterinarian within 72 hours prior to shipping to Utah. The Certificate of Veterinary Inspection must include a statement by an accredited veterinarian certifying that:
      • All rabbits and hares in the shipment have been examined for and found free of communicable diseases, and
      • All rabbits and hares have originated from a single premises that has no signs of a communicable disease, and
      • There have been no movements of rabbits and hares onto the premises over the prior 30-days, and
      • The animals have had no contact with wild rabbits or hares in the past 30 days.
    2. No rabbits and hares or rabbit and hare products (meat, pelts, hides, carcasses, etc) and equipment or other items or associated materials may enter Utah from a premises known to be affected with RHD.
    Vermont No No From Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food & Markets,[83]

    First, contact your veterinarian to report your concerns. Your veterinarian will contact the Vermont state or federal veterinarian. If you do not have a veterinarian, contact the VT state veterinarian directly at (802)828-2421. Second, preserve at least one rabbit (if a large colony die-off) for testing by double bagging the carcass and refrigerating it. Do not freeze the carcass as this will render it unavailable for diagnostic testing. Liver samples are required for PCR testing, and there is no antemortem test available at this time.

    From National Assembly of State Animal Health Officials,[84]

    Interstate Movement

    • Each state has different import requirements for rabbits. Vermont does not have statemandated import requirements for domestic rabbits, but all individuals or businesses planning to acquire new rabbits should ensure those animals are free of signs of contagious disease as determined by a veterinarian. This assurance will help protect resident domestic rabbits by lowering the risk of disease introduction.
    • Rabbits should never be imported into Vermont from regions or states affected by RHDV2.
    • When exporting domestic rabbits, check with the state of destination for health and traceability requirements and adhere to them consistently.
    • The Vermont Department of Fish and Wildlife regulates the intentional movement of wild rabbits into and within Vermont, and questions regarding those movements should be directed to that department
    From Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food & Markets,[85]
    • Because of the severity of this disease and our current inability to protect rabbits through vaccination, Vermont rabbit owners and caretakers must practice strict biosecurity at all times when working with rabbits to protect them from RHDV2 and other contagious diseases. These measures include:
    • Do not acquire rabbits from regions of the country with positive cases of RHDV2. A map of infected areas can be found here: https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/maps/animalhealth/rhd.
    • Do not allow pet or wild rabbits to have contact with your rabbits or gain entry to the facility or home. If you must bring outside rabbits into your facility or home, keep them separated from your existing rabbits for at least 30 days and monitor closely for signs of disease. Use separate equipment for newly acquired or sick rabbits to avoid spreading disease.
    • Do not allow visitors in rabbitries or let them handle pet rabbits without protective clothing (including coveralls, shoe covers, hair covering, and gloves).
    • Always wash hands with warm soapy water before entering your rabbit area, after removing protective clothing and before leaving the rabbit area.
    • Do not introduce new rabbits from unknown or untrusted sources or from those that cannot confirm the rabbit’s health status for 30 days prior to acquisition.
    • Sanitize all equipment and cages moved on or off premises before they are returned to the rabbit housing area. We recommend disinfecting with 10% bleach or 10% sodium hydroxide mixed with water.
    Virginia No Yes
    • 2021/10/06 Medgene[3]
    From Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources,[86]

    If you suspect RHDV2, please report it to either a Virginia Department of Wildlife Resources Regional Office or via the Wildlife Conflict Helpline at 855-571-9003. This number is active Monday to Friday, 8:30 AM - 4 PM.

    From Virginia's Legislative Information System,[87]

    2VAC5-141-40. Import restrictions; exemptions.

    A. No person shall import into Virginia an agricultural animal, pet animal, primate, or any other animal or bird of any species that is affected with or that has been exposed to any reportable infectious or contagious disease except by permit issued at the State Veterinarian's discretion.

    B. When the State Veterinarian is informed of any unusual or serious outbreak of disease among livestock or poultry in any other region that, in his opinion, constitutes a threat to livestock and poultry in Virginia, he shall by proclamation prohibit the entrance of any livestock or poultry that originate either directly or indirectly from that region at his discretion, except by permit. He may also prohibit the entrance of any products as defined in the meat or poultry inspection regulations of the USDA, in the Virginia Meat and Poultry Products Inspection Act, or in any other applicable or related Virginia statutes and regulations, except by permit. Specific classes of animals as listed in this chapter also require a permit for entry into Virginia.

    C. Agricultural animals, pet animals, primates, or any other animals or birds of any species imported into Virginia for bona fide scientific research by a recognized agricultural institution or institution licensed by the USDA, and for which compliance with the requirements of this chapter would be a detriment to the research, may be excused from the requirements at the discretion of the State Veterinarian by the issuance of a permit.

    ...

    2VAC5-141-80. Pet animal entry requirements; exemptions.

    A. Within the 10 days prior to its date of entry into Virginia, a pet animal must be deemed healthy and free of infectious diseases after examination by an accredited veterinarian. Proof of examination must be submitted with the permit request and on a Certificate of Veterinary Inspection in a format approved by the State Veterinarian.

    ...

    D. A pet animal kept properly under control by its owner or custodian when traveling through Virginia to another state shall not be subject to the requirements of this chapter.

    E. A pet animal brought into Virginia by a resident of Virginia or by a resident of another state who intends to make his residence in Virginia shall not be subject to the requirements of this chapter unless the pet animal is brought into Virginia to be offered for public adoption, transfer, sale, trade, or promotional incentive.

    F. A pet animal (i) brought into Virginia for less than 10 days, (ii) for the purpose of hunting or legal exhibition, and (iii) with no change of ownership shall not be subject to the requirements of this chapter.

    G. This section shall not be construed to (i) permit the entry into Virginia of any species of animal otherwise prohibited or restricted by any state or federal law, regulation, or directive or (ii) contravene additional entry requirements imposed by any state or federal law, regulation, or directive.

    Washington Yes Yes
    • 2020/01 Filavac/Eravac
    • 2021/10/05 Medgene[3][88]
    From Washington State Department of Agriculture,[89]

    If an owned rabbit dies and RHD could be the cause, double bag the body in plastic bags and refrigerate it until given more instructions. Do not freeze it. Contact the WSDA at (360) 902-1878 or ahealth@agr.wa.gov for more information. If you find a dead feral domestic or wild rabbit, contact the WSDA to determine whether or not this carcass should be submitted for testing. Always wear disposable gloves when handling a dead animal; dispose of them when done and wash your hands.

    From Washington State Legislature,[90]

    Certificate of veterinary inspection, and entry permit requirements.

    (1) All animals entering Washington state must comply with the requirements of USDA, APHIS regulations found at Title 9 C.F.R. (January 1, 2014) for movement or importation from foreign countries.

    (2) Certificate of veterinary inspection:

    (a) A certificate of veterinary inspection must accompany all animals entering Washington state, except where specifically exempted in this chapter. Certificates of veterinary inspection expire thirty days from the date of issuance.

    (b) The certificate of veterinary inspection must show that all livestock listed have been examined and found in compliance with vaccination, testing and identification requirements under Title 9 C.F.R. Part 86 (January 1, 2014).

    (c) Livestock entering Washington state for veterinary care or as part of a veterinary research project where there will be constant veterinary care or supervision for the duration of the time spent in Washington state are exempt from import test requirements and certificate of veterinary inspection requirements. An entry permit is required. (d) Any exemption to the requirement for a certificate of veterinary inspection may be suspended during an emergency disease condition declared by the director. ...

    From Washington State Department of Agriculture,[89]

    Rabbit owners should familiarize themselves with the WSDA’s recommendations and enact the following biosecurity measures from here on:

    • Keep rabbits inside if possible.
    • Have indoor and outdoor footwear; don’t wear outdoor shoes indoors and vice versa.
    • Wash hands before and after handling or caring for rabbits.
    • Clean and disinfect feeders and other equipment daily if possible. Clean with soap and water, rinse well, spray with or submerge in 10% bleach for 10 minutes, rinse well, and let dry before re-use.
    • Control flies, rats, cats, dogs, birds, etc. that can move the virus around on their feet or body.
    • Don't allow visitors who also have rabbits.
    • Prevent contact with wild rabbits.
    • Do not put rabbits down on the ground to eat grass, etc.
    • Do not collect outdoor forage and browse to feed rabbits; stay with pelleted feed for now. Treats can include raw vegetables from grocery stores.
    • Don't handle others' rabbits.
    • Monitor your rabbits closely for going off feed, looking limp/depressed, or behaving differently in any way. This viral form (RHDV2) is less fatal than the two other versions, so treatment may be successful if started right away. Call your vet ASAP if you note signs of illness in your rabbit.
    • Report all unusual mass morbidity (sickness) or mortality (death) events to WSDA.
    • Subscribe to updates from the WSDA email list.
    West Virginia No Yes
    • 2021/10/05 Medgene[3]
    From West Virginia Department of Agriculture,[91]

    Persons responsible for reporting: veterinary diagnostic laboratories, veterinary practitioners, livestock inspectors, and livestock owners. Please report any increases in abortions or mortality

    West Virginia Department of Agriculture
    Animal Health Division
    1900 Kanawha Blvd. East, Charleston, WV 25305-0172
    Phone (304) 558-2214 FAX (304) 558-2231

    N/A
    Wisconsin No Yes
    • 2021/10/08 Medgene[92]
    From Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection,[93]

    If any rabbits die in your rabbitry, work with your veterinarian for diagnostics and disposal. Do not bury or compost these animals if there is a chance they could have this disease.

    From Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources, [94]

    Report cases of multiple (three or more) wild rabbit and hare deaths to the DNR by contacting your county Wildlife Biologist.

    From State of Wisconsin Department of Agriculture, Trade and Consumer Protection,[95]

    Information specifically for rabbits:

    Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Serotype 2 (RHDV2) has been confirmed in other states including Minnesota. RHDV2 has not been detected in Wisconsin. There are currently no restrictions on rabbit imports or movements within Wisconsin.

    Those who choose to import rabbits are required to meet Wisconsin's import requirements which include obtaining a certificate of veterinary inspection. Animals, including rabbits, showing signs of infectious or contagious disease are not eligible for import. It is further recommended to follow biosecurity practices including the consideration of vaccination in states in which vaccine is approved. More information can be found on DATCP's RHDV2 page.

    For all household pets including rabbits:

    You must provide a certificate of veterinary inspection (CVI) when importing a household pet. A CVI is required for animals entering Wisconsin by any mode of transportation, such as automobile, airplane or rail.

    Wyoming Yes Yes
    • 2021/10/05 Medgene[3]
    From Wyoming Livestock Board,[96]

    RHDV2 is a reportable disease in Wyoming and the United States and anyone suspecting the disease in domestic rabbits is required to report to the State Veterinarian and USDA APHIS immediately. If a case in a domestic rabbit is suspected, veterinarians should contact USDA APHIS or the Wyoming State Veterinarian’s office at 307-857-4140 or 307-777-6440.

    Any suspect wild rabbit deaths should be reported to the Wyoming Game and Fish Department’s State Wildlife Veterinarian at the Wildlife Health Laboratory, 307-745-5865.

    From Wyoming Livestock Board, [97]

    Section 7. General import requirements.

    (a) All Animals imported into Wyoming shall be accompanied by a paper or digital Interstate Certificate of Veterinary Inspection, and an Import Permit or Shipping Number when required, issued in compliance with these Rules and all applicable state and federal Animal health regulations, except:

    (i) Animals consigned for Direct Movement from a Farm or Ranch of Origin within the United States to an Approved Livestock Market, or to a Recognized Slaughter Establishment for Immediate Slaughter.

    (ii) Animals imported directly to a Wyoming licensed veterinarian for treatment, diagnosis, or testing, and then returning directly to the farm or ranch of origin are not required to have an ICVI. Return to farm or ranch of origin requires a Wyoming brand inspection and compliance with the destination state’s import requirements. Wyoming veterinarians receiving such animals shall notify the Board and/or maintain records of all such activities as required by the Wyoming State Veterinarian.

    (iii) Animals returning to Wyoming on a Commuter Permit or an Adjacent State Contiguous Property Movement Permit as detailed in Sections 22 and 23 of this rule.

    (iv) Horses moving on a valid Extended Equine Certificate of Veterinary Inspection in compliance with the requirements.

    (b) All commercial Animal carriers importing Animals are required to stop at the first Port of Entry encountered in Wyoming.

    (c) Any person importing, causing to be imported, or directing to be imported any Animal into Wyoming shall comply with these Rules and all applicable federal Animal health regulations.

    See also

    References

    1. United States Department of Agriculture. (2020). RHDV2 Vaccine Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs). Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from https://wabbitwiki.com/images/f/fa/Usda-rhdv2-vaccine-faqs.pdf
    2. California Department of Food and Agriculture. (2021). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHD). Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/AHFSS/Animal_Health/RHD.html
    3. 3.00 3.01 3.02 3.03 3.04 3.05 3.06 3.07 3.08 3.09 3.10 3.11 3.12 3.13 3.14 3.15 3.16 3.17 3.18 3.19 3.20 3.21 3.22 3.23 3.24 3.25 3.26 3.27 3.28 3.29 3.30 3.31 3.32 3.33 3.34 3.35 3.36 3.37 RHDV Information Page. (2021). Facebook post. Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from https://www.facebook.com/groups/237085364322559/posts/485008756196884/
    4. Alabama Department of Agriculture & Industries. (n.d.). Alabama Priority Reportable Diseases. Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from https://agi.alabama.gov/animalindustries/animal-health/alabama-priority-reportable-diseases/
    5. Department of Environmental Conservation. (2020). New Rabbit Import Requirements Due To Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease. Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from https://dec.alaska.gov/eh/vet/rabbit-hemorrhagic-disease/import-requirements/
    6. Arizona Department of Agriculture. (2020). Rabbit Disease Confirmed in Arizona. Retrieved 17 Feb 2022 from https://agriculture.az.gov/sites/default/files/AZDA%20press%20release%20Rabbit%20Virus%204-2020.pdf
    7. Arizona Department of Agriculture. (n.d.). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Fact Sheet. Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from https://agriculture.az.gov/animals/rabbit-hemorrhagic-disease/rabbit-hemorrhagic-disease-fact-sheet
    8. 8.0 8.1 Arkansas Department of Agriculture. (2020). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease. Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from https://www.agriculture.arkansas.gov/wp-content/uploads/2020/06/200614_4CP-Rabbit-Hemorrhagic-Disease-Brochure.pdf
    9. 9.0 9.1 Arkansas Department of Agriculture. (n.d.). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease. Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease
    10. 10.0 10.1 California Department of Food and Agriculture. (2021). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHD). Retrieved 17 Feb 2022 from https://www.cdfa.ca.gov/AHFSS/Animal_Health/RHD.html
    11. County of Los Angeles Public Health. (n.d.). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Detected in California. Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from http://publichealth.lacounty.gov/vet/RHDV.htm
    12. Colorado Department of Agriculture. (2021). Colorado Veterinarian’s Office Approves Use of New Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Vaccine. Retrieved 17 Feb 2022 from https://ag.colorado.gov/press-release/colorado-veterinarians-office-approves-use-of-new-rabbit-hemorrhagic-disease-vaccine
    13. 13.0 13.1 Colorado Department of Agriculture. (n.d.). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus (RHDV2). Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from https://ag.colorado.gov/animals/livestock-health/rabbit-hemorrhagic-disease-virus-rhdv2
    14. Colorado Department of Agriculture. (2021). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Guidance for Shows and Fairs. Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from https://drive.google.com/file/d/1f1ci2muFdoyi1-PLNKNXBUWSeYjHWbuf/view
    15. Colorado Department of Agriculture. (2021). Biosecurity Practices for RHDV2. Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from https://drive.google.com/file/d/1rYSwN6cbWtntnIFo-_DoUGwfFYDC8m3i/view
    16. Connecticut Department of Agriculture. (2021). Retrieved 17 Feb 2022 from https://portal.ct.gov/DOAG/Press-Room/Press-Releases/2021/CONNECTICUT-STATE-VETERINARIAN-ANNOUNCES-AVAILABILITY-OF-RABBIT-HEMORRHAGIC-DISEASE-VIRUS-VACCINE
    17. Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection. (n.d.). Wildlife Diseases > Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease. Retrieved 20 Feb 2022 from https://portal.ct.gov/DEEP/Wildlife/Wildlife-Diseases#RHDV2
    18. Connecticut Department of Agriculture. (2021). Health Requirements Regarding the Importation of Animals Into the State of Connecticut. Retrieved 20 Feb 2022 from https://portal.ct.gov/-/media/DOAG/State-Vet/2021/CTImportRequirements2021.pdf
    19. 19.0 19.1 Delaware Department of Agriculture. (2020). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease. Retrieved 20 Feb 2022 from https://agriculture.delaware.gov/wp-content/uploads/sites/108/2020/07/Rabbit-Hemorrhagic-Disease-Fact-Sheet_7.24.20.pdf
    20. DC Health. (n.d.). Traveling Into the District of Columbia With Pets. Retrieved 20 Feb 2022 from https://dchealth.dc.gov/page/traveling-district-columbia-pets.
    21. 21.0 21.1 Maryland Department of Agriculture. (2019). State Regulations for Maryland. Retrieved 20 Feb 2022 from https://mda.maryland.gov/AnimalHealth/Documents/import%20regulations.pdf
    22. 22.0 22.1 22.2 Florida Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services. (2022). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Update. Retrieved 17 Feb 2022 from https://www.fdacs.gov/content/download/98220/file/RHD2-Website-20211019.pdf
    23. 23.0 23.1 Georgia Department of Agriculture. (2022). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Update. Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from https://agr.georgia.gov/Data/Sites/1/media/ag_animalindustry/animal_health/files/Rabbit-Hemorrhagic-Disease-Virus-Updated-01-24-2022.pdf
    24. State of Hawaii Animal Industry Division. (n.d.). Importing Other Species. Retrieved 20 Feb 2022 from https://hdoa.hawaii.gov/ai/ldc/importing-livestock/other-species/
    25. Idaho State Department of Agriculture. (2021). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHD) Confirmed in Idaho Wild Jackrabbits. Retrieved 17 Feb 2022 from https://agri.idaho.gov/main/wp-content/uploads/2021/03/News-Release_ISDA-IDFG_RHD_March-26-2021.pdf
    26. Idaho State Department of Agriculture. (n.d.). Small Animal Imports. Retrieved 20 Feb 2022 from https://agri.idaho.gov/main/animals/small-animal-species/small-animal-imports/
    27. Illinois Department of Agriculture. (n.d.). Other Species. Retrieved 20 Feb 2022 from https://www2.illinois.gov/sites/agr/Animals/AnimalHealth/Pages/Other-Species.aspx
    28. Illinois Department of Agriculture. (n.d.). Animal Import. Retrieved 20 Feb 2022 from https://www2.illinois.gov/sites/agr/Animals/AnimalHealth/Pages/Animal-Import.aspx#h16
    29. Indiana State Board of Animal Health. (2021). Indiana Grants Access to New Vaccine for Rabbits. Retrieved 17 Feb 2022 from https://www.in.gov/boah/files/RHDv-VaccineRelease-PR-10-2021.pdf
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    31. Indiana State Board of Animal Health. (2020). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease (RHDV): What Rabbit Owners Need to Know. Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from https://www.in.gov/boah/files/Rabbit_RHDV_6-2020.pdf
    32. 32.0 32.1 Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship. (2021). Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship Approves Emergency Use of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Vaccine. Retrieved 17 Feb 2022 from https://iowaagriculture.gov/news/idals-authorizes-use-rhdv2-vaccine-1082021
    33. Iowa Legislature. (2014). Iowa Administrative Code > Chapter 65 ANIMAL AND LIVESTOCK IMPORTATION > 21—65.3 (163) General requirements and limitations. Retrieved 20 Feb 2022 from https://www.legis.iowa.gov/docs/iac/rule/04-22-2009.21.65.3.pdf
    34. Kansas Department of Agriculture. (n.d.). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus Serotype 2. Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from https://agriculture.ks.gov/divisions-programs/division-of-animal-health/animal-diseases/rabbit-hemorrhagic-disease-virus-serotype-2-(rhdv2)
    35. Kansas Department of Agriculture. (n.d.). Import and Export Regulations. Retrieved 20 Feb 2022 from https://agriculture.ks.gov/divisions-programs/division-of-animal-health/import-and-export-regulationsah
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    46. Mississippi Board of Animal Health. (2021). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease - Medgene Emergency Use Authorization. Retrieved 17 Feb 2022 from http://www.mbah.ms.gov/rabbithem/medgeneeua.html
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    48. Mississippi Board of Animal Health. (n.d.). Ch. 12 - Entry Requirements. Retrieved 21 Feb 2022 from http://www.mbah.ms.gov/regulations/regulations_html/ch12.htm
    49. Missouri Department of Conservation. (n.d.). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus 2 (RHDV2). Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from https://mdc.mo.gov/wildlife/wildlife-diseases/rabbit-hemorrhagic-disease-virus-2-rhdv2
    50. Missouri Department of Agriculture. (2020). Rules of Department of Agriculture > Division 30—Animal Health > Chapter 2—Health Requirements for Movement of Livestock, Poultry, and Exotic Animals. Retrieved 24 Feb 2022 from https://www.sos.mo.gov/cmsimages/adrules/csr/current/2csr/2c30-2.pdf
    51. State of Montana Newsroom. (2021). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Reported in Yellowstone County. Retrieved 18 Feb 2022 from https://news.mt.gov/Department-of-Livestock/Rabbit-Hemorrhagic-Disease-Reported-in-Yellowstone-County
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    53. 53.0 53.1 53.2 Nebraska Department of Agriculture. (2021). Rabbit Owners Should Talk With Vets About RHDV Vaccine Options. Retrieved 17 Feb 2022 from https://nda.nebraska.gov/press/october2021/RHDVvaccine.pdf
    54. Nevada Department of Agriculture. (n.d.). Rabbits/Hares. Retrieved 17 Feb 2022 from https://agri.nv.gov/Animals/Animal_Disease/Rabbits-Hares/
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    56. 56.0 56.1 New Jersey Department of Agriculture. (2021). New Jersey Department of Agriculture Approves Sale of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Vaccine. Retrieved 17 Feb 2022 from https://www.nj.gov/agriculture/news/press/2021/approved/press211112a.html
    57. New Mexico Game and Fish. (2020). Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Cause for Rabbit Mortality. Retrieved 20 Feb 2022 from https://www.wildlife.state.nm.us/rabbit-hemorrhagic-disease-cause-for-rabbit-mortality/
    58. 58.0 58.1 The New York State Department of Agriculture and Markets. (2021). State Agriculture Department Confirms Case of Rabbit Hemorrhagic Disease Virus 2 in New York. Retrieved 17 Feb 2022 from https://agriculture.ny.gov/news/state-agriculture-department-confirms-case-rabbit-hemorrhagic-disease-virus-2-new-york
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